Penny’s Story

Penny’s Story

Hi, my name is Lindsey. That’s my daughter on the bed with my mum Penny. Mum has Multiple Sclerosis, that hideous disease that disrupts the communication between our brain and our body, so that eventually we have a fully functioning brain but our body shuts down completely.

Mum has the progressive type of this disease, so while we are fortunate to have her in our lives for longer, the relentless deterioration of movement and the constant pain is difficult to watch in someone you love.

Especially someone who is so full of life as my mother. She has always been such an independent and inspirational woman. Growing up with her was a lot of fun. Even though she worked full time as a teacher, she was very active and played netball and badminton.

She was also very musical, playing the piano all the time. And she loved nothing more than to get us kids involved in sport and music, along with sailing, swimming and always, just having a good time as a family.

Even now, mum is so strong and never complains about anything, even when she’s having a tough time and in pain. She always makes sure her MS has as little impact on us as possible. But it’s hard on everyone. Whether it’s going to a café and finding she isn’t able to access the table easily or get to the toilet, or facing the humiliation of having everyone speak to me and not her simply because she’s in a wheelchair.

Reading our story, you can understand why our whole family is so motivated to be associated with the Eyewall Foundation and their funding of new research. You see, the particular type of MS my mum has is seeing very little research progress. My mother’s management plan, for example, hasn’t changed in the past 20 years! The investment in research is so low that although mum is more than willing to participate in clinical trials for better treatments, she has never had the opportunity.

What’s more, MS is still very much a mystery disease, with no answers to why someone gets it and why others don’t. Finding out the answers to questions like these would be amazing. We hope that Eyewall’s work to sponsor full time researchers and invest in new programmes will help make that happen.

Our medical research

The research we’re funding is undertaken in Western Australia and by a global network of medical practitioners. Take a look.

What we’re trying to achieve.

We’re a young foundation with big dreams. Our funding is aimed at a number of critical areas of vmedical research.

Meet the researchers.

The research we’re funding is undertaken in Western Australia and by a global network of medical practitioners. Take a look.

Read More

Belinda’s Story

Belinda's Story

Dr Belinda Kaskow joined our medical research team in 2021. Belinda’s story, and her journey to join us, is remarkable. And incredibly moving. Her passion to see diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis and cancer eradicated from the human race forever has a very personal motive.

Belinda completed her Ph.D. at the University of Western Australia and then moved to Boston, USA to conduct postdoctoral research into the causes and treatments for neurological diseases.

She worked at some of the world’s most renowned medical organisations, including the Ann Romney Centre for Neurologic Diseases at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School and the Broad institute of MIT and Harvard.

It was while overseas working with respected neurologists Dr. Philip De Jager and Dr. Howard Weiner and immunology researcher Dr. Clare Baecher-Allan, that her immediate family experienced the tragedy of cancer. Not once, but four times.

You can imagine how this experience spurred on Belinda’s lifelong desire to bring all her international expertise back to the West Australian scientific community. This goal was finally made possible in 2021 when the Eyewall Foundation sponsored her appointment as a Post-Doctoral Scientist at the Perron Institute.

Belinda is now living in Perth with her husband and two young children and is continuing her postdoctoral research at the Perron Institute. The unknowns faced by her family members drive Belinda’s ongoing passion to solve the riddle of incurable neurological disease in the hopes to help individuals and their loved ones everywhere.

Our medical research

The research we’re funding is undertaken in Western Australia and by a global network of medical practitioners. Take a look.

What we’re trying to achieve.

We’re a young foundation with big dreams. Our funding is aimed at a number of critical areas of medical research.

Meet the researchers.

The research we’re funding is undertaken in Western Australia and by a global network of medical practitioners. Take a look.

Read More

The Story of Zoe’s Mum.

The Story of Zoe’s Mum.

“My beautiful mum Jean was a strong, independent and healthy woman when she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease in 2008. She was 56.

Although Mum accepted her diagnosis with a great deal of dignity and grace given the future she faced, the news was devastating for our whole family. The outlook for her ever experiencing any sort of recovery was essentially without hope.

Knowing in advance the devastation this disease brings upon the sufferer – and their loved ones – must have been frightening and distressing for her. Alzheimer’s is so much more than a loss of memory, particularly in the young and otherwise healthy.

Fortunately, while not without its significant challenges, particularly for Dad, Mum was able to live at home for many years as her illness progressed. Compared to many people, Mum had a very good quality of life and continued to enjoy many of life’s simple pleasures, like a cup of coffee by the ocean, listening to The Beatles or completing a Sudoku.
However, the day inevitably arrived where Mum could no longer remain safely at home and had to move into professional care. Some truly awful times followed when the full extent of the disease devastated her mind and body. Until the end, Dad continued to bring her a coffee every day and play her favourite music. Alzheimer’s destroys a lot, but not his love for her.

In 2017 and at the age of just 65, Mum passed away, only a few weeks shy of her granddaughter Phoebe’s first birthday. For Phoebe, the memories of her Grandma Jean are what we tell her, in the little stories and sayings and quirks that make a person who they are, and that hint to the values they hold. She will grow up remembering her Grandma Jean as a strong, intelligent and independent woman who was courageous and gracious in the face of her decline, and who loved and cared for her family above all else.

Way back at the start of this tragic journey, Mum knew there was little that could be done to treat or delay the consequences of the disease. Early in her diagnosis, however, she agreed without hesitation to participate in medical research programs, including drug trials and organ donation. She understood that her contribution, however small, would in some way contribute to lessening the suffering of others. So that some day, someone may not have to suffer as she did. As we all did.”

This is why Eyewall exists. Thanks to Zoe Kelsey. (Nee Howe)

Our medical research

The research we’re funding is undertaken in Western Australia and by a global network of medical practitioners. Take a look.

What we’re trying to achieve.

We’re a young foundation with big dreams. Our funding is aimed at a number of critical areas of vmedical research.

Meet the researchers.

The research we’re funding is undertaken in Western Australia and by a global network of medical practitioners. Take a look.

Read More